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Academy Xi Blog

10 digital skills to power-up your career for 2022

By Academy Xi

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Following a year of rising demand for online goods and services, the digital revolution is set to move into 2022. Are you ready to play your part? Power-up your career with in-demand digital skills.

Group sitting at desk working behind computer

The ‘Great Resignation’ has created a seismic shift towards staff with a digital skillset, with 87% of Australian jobs now asking for digital literacy skills and 61% of the nation’s total future training needs assessed as being digital. These are the roles Australia needs to fill, and luckily, these are the roles lots of us want.

With the demand for digital skills heavily outweighing supply, there’s never been a better time to get ahead of the curve, sharpen your digital skills and start a new year’s revolution.

We’ve put together a list of 10 digital skills destined to be in high demand, helping you plan your next move and power-up your job prospects for 2022.

1. User Experience Design

What is User Experience Design?

User Experience (UX) aims to improve all aspects of an end user’s interaction with a company, its services and products.

As a UX Designer, you examine each and every element that marketing, selling and using a product or service entails. You optimise how easy and pleasing it is for a user to complete their desired tasks and use a product or service to good effect. This could include anything from how it feels to ride a racing bike, to how straightforward the purchase process is when buying that bike online.

Your ultimate goal as a UX Designer is to create easy, efficient, relevant and all-round enjoyable experiences for the user, mostly in the digital space.

2. User Interface Design

What is User Interface Design?

UX and User Interface (UI) often go hand-in-hand. UI is all about the actual interface of a product, including the visual design of the screens a user moves through when using a mobile app, or the buttons they click when browsing a website, making that bike purchase dynamic, efficient and a strong aesthetic representation of a brand.

As a UI designer, you’ll create all the visual and interactive elements of a product interface, covering everything from typography, colour palettes and page layouts, to animated features and navigational touch points (including buttons and scrollbars).

Demand for User Experience and User Interface

With so many products and services now being delivered online, the year ahead is expected to see surging demand for skilled UX and UI designers, with roles increasing by 12.3% in the next five years. The current average salary of a UX UI designer is $110,000.

If you’re ready to add a UX UI Design dimension to your career, explore Academy Xi course options.

3. Software Engineering

What is Software Engineering?

Software Engineers design and implement a set of instructions or programs that tell a computer what to do. It’s independent of hardware and makes computers programmable. There are three basic forms of software:

  • System Software facilitates core functions, such as operating systems, disk management, utilities, hardware management and operational necessities.
  • Programming Software offers programmers tools such as text editors, compilers, linkers and debuggers, all used to create code.
  • Application software (or apps) helps users perform tasks. Professional productivity suites, cyber security, data management software and media players are all widely worked with by Software Engineers. Application Software also works with web apps, is used to shop online, socialise with Facebook or share pictures on Instagram.

As well as distinguishing a company from its competitors, Software Engineering means you can improve the client’s experiences, bring more feature-rich and innovative products to market, and make digital setups more safe, productive, and efficient.

Demand for Software Engineering

Making a vital all round contribution, there are currently over 7000 Australian Software Engineer roles offering an average salary of nearly $100,000.

If you believe Software Engineering can drive your career in 2022, check out our course options.

4. Artificial Intelligence

What is Artificial Intelligence?

Artificial intelligence (AI) is a broad form of computer science that focuses on designing and building smart machines and software capable of performing tasks that typically require human intelligence (be careful not to make too much progress – you might find yourself out of the job).

Though it seems far-fetched, AI is embedded into our everyday lives, enabling your car to park itself and Alexa to play your entrance music as soon as you walk through the door. Once you’ve vaulted onto the couch, Netflix can recommend a sci-fi movie based on your tastes (Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines. Too scary? Netflix suggests Wall-E instead).

Demand for Artificial Intelligence

Given the increasing sophistication of the programs and machines we’re capable of creating, Artificial Intelligence is certain to grow exponentially for decades to come.

If you want to understand the history of AI and how it’s being applied commercially in the here and now, find out more in this IBM report.

There are over 1500 AI related roles advertised on the Australian jobs market (LinkedIn, 2021), while the average salary is $111,000 (Payscale, 2021).

Machine using a computer

5. Machine Learning

What is Machine Learning?

Machine Learning is a branch of Artificial Intelligence concerned with using data and algorithms to imitate the way that humans learn, slowly but surely improving AI’s accuracy.

Often processing ‘big data’, algorithms are trained to respond to statistics and make classifications or predictions, uncovering key data insights.

You can use Machine Learning insights to make intelligent, strategic decisions about how applications and businesses operate, ideally generating an upturn in a company’s most important metrics.

Demand for Machine Learning

As the ability to handle and harness big data continues to improve, the demand for data scientists with a Machine Learning skillset will only increase.

The value of the global Machine Learning market is projected to reach $117 billion by 2027, at a growth rate of 39.2% over the next 6 years.

The average Machine Learning Engineer salary is over $133,000 with 1300 roles currently up for grabs in Australia.

6. Python Programming

What is Python Programming?

Python is a computer programming language often used to build websites and software, automate tasks, and perform data analysis. Python is a general purpose coding language and isn’t specialised for solving any specific problems, meaning it can be used to create a variety of different programs.

Programming image on phone

You can use Python Programming on different platforms (including Windows, Mac, Linux, Raspberry Pi) and will find it has a simple syntax, similar to the English language, that allows you to write and develop programs with fewer lines.

As a Python Programmer, you can write code that connects database systems, reads and modifies files, handles big data and performs complex mathematics. Because of its simplicity, Python is often used for rapid prototyping and software development.

Demand for Python Programming

According to a Developer Survey by StackOverflow, Python has been one of the most in-demand technologies throughout 2021, with the need for Python Programmers set to grow in 2022.

Over 7000 programming roles demanding Python skills are available in Australia, with salaries topping out at $200,000.

If you want to add Python to your programming skillset, check out our Data Analytics courses.

7. Structured Query Language

What is Structured Query Language?

Structured Query Language (SQL) is a standard programming language for relational databases. It’s the most widely used database language and is often thought of as a Data Analyst’s best friend.

Because SQL is so frequently applied, knowing how to use it is extremely valuable if you want to be involved in computer programming, or even use databases to collect and organise information more expansively and efficiently.

SQL works like a spreadsheet, a bit like Microsoft Excel, but can help you compile and manage data in much greater volumes, seamlessly merging millions, or even billions, of cells of data.

Demand for SQL

There are currently over 12000 roles in Australia that require the use of SQL skills in part and over 3,000 developer roles that work with SQL specifically. The average SQL developer salary in Australia is over $103,000.

If you want to put SQL to work, take a look at our Data Analytics courses.

8. Augmented Reality

What is Augmented Reality?

Augmented reality is the end result of using technology and digital programming to superimpose information, in the form of sounds, images and text, onto the world we experience.

Picture the lazy genius Tony Stark in Ironman and his interactive holograms mapping out the world’s contents, all of which he can rearrange and manipulate whilst hardly moving a muscle.

In more realistic terms, phones and tablets are how augmented reality features in most people’s lives. You can use Vito Technology’s Star Walk app by pointing the camera on your mobile device at the sky and see the names of stars and planets superimposed on the image.

Another app called Layar uses your smartphone’s GPS and camera to gather information about your surroundings. It then overlays information on the image about nearby restaurants, shops and points of interest. There’s endless potential for what you can do with Augmented Reality.

Demand for Augmented Reality

Working with Augmented Reality is an exciting job prospect, but it’s a tech field that’s still relatively niche. That said, it is growing quickly, with demand for AR talent rising by an incredible 1400% over the past year.

There are around 100 roles that work directly with Augmented Reality in Australia at the moment, although many more draw on its principles.

For the lucky few, you can expect to earn between $100-150,000. If you save hard and push your AR skills, you might even develop your own Ironman suit and never walk from the sofa to the fridge again.

9. Data Science and Data Analytics

What are Data Science and Data Analytics?

While Data Science is all about finding meaningful correlations between large datasets, Data Analytics is designed to delve into the specifics of extracted insights.

Simply put, Data Analytics is a branch of Data Science that finds specific answers to the questions that Data Science raises.

As a Data Analyst, you gather, clean and examine data, using it to solve all kinds of problems and help a business or organisation make better decisions.

You often apply four core forms of Data Analysis: descriptive analysis will tell you what happened, diagnostic analysis will tell you why it happened, predictive analysis will form projections about the future, and prescriptive analysis will generate actionable solutions.

Demand for Data Science and Data Analytics

Data science and analytics is forecast to grow by 27% in the next five years, with more and more roles set to appear in Australia.

The average salary for a Data Analyst is over $104,000, while even entry-level roles earn an average of more than $90,000. With well over 16000 Data Analyst jobs available in Australia, it’s definitely a career worth pursuing.

If you’re ready to drive your operation forward with Data Analysis, take a look at our Data Analytics courses.

Woman working on screen of data

10. Cyber Security

What is Cyber Security?

Cyber Security is the process of protecting systems, networks, and programs from digital attacks. Cyber attacks are usually carried out to access, change or destroy sensitive information. They also often entail extorting money from people or businesses, or interrupting normal business processes.

Implementing effective Cyber Security measures is especially challenging in today’s world because there are more devices than people, while attackers are becoming evermore innovative in their methods.

As a Cyber Security professional, your job description will typically entail installing firewall and encryption tools, reporting breaches or weak spots, researching cyber attack trends, educating the rest of the company on security, or even simulating security attacks to identify potential vulnerabilities.

Demand for Cyber Security

The field of Cyber Security is always growing, with new trends, practices, technology and threats emerging each year. Global spending for the industry is projected to skyrocket by 88% and hit $270 billion US dollars by 2026.

According to the Australian Government’s own Cyber Security Strategy, ‘Australia is suffering from a Cyber Security skills shortage.’ This shortage provides a golden opportunity for people with Cyber Security skills, as according to Australian employment projections, demand for their capabilities will grow by at least 21% before May 2023.

There are nearly 2000 Cyber Security roles on offer in Australia right now, with an average salary of more than $115,000.

So there you have it, 10 digital skills that can help you power-up your career for the year ahead!

As well as vowing to self-improve by drinking more green juices, learning to play the banjo, or doing a couch-to-10K whilst playing that banjo in your Ironman suit, maybe it’s time to start a new year’s revolution. Think big and develop a digital skillset that gives you the strength and knowhow to push things forward for everyone’s benefit.

If you’re determined to start the new year with a bang, but still can’t decide which career path to take, chat to one of course advisors and discuss your options today.

Academy Xi offers a full range of digital skills courses, with real-world projects that lead to industry recognised qualifications.

We’re here to help you develop a skillset that enables you to build, move and improve in 2022.

Student Spotlight: Barry Nguyen

Academy Xi Blog

Student Spotlight: Barry Nguyen

By Academy Xi

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Startup Founder, Entrepreneur, Advisor — and now Physiotherapist turned Software Engineer — Barry Nguyen proves that curiosity, passion and continuous learning can help you get ahead of the curve.

Student Spotlight: Barry Nguyen

We caught up with Barry, one of our recent Software Engineering Transform graduates. He’s kindly taken the time to share his adventures and career transition in the ‘tech world’ as a learner and startup founder. We’ll also talk about why he recommends this course to other startup founders and entrepreneurs.

Hi Barry! Thanks for taking the time to share your Xi experience with us.  How did your career in Software Engineering take shape?

After I completed my health sciences degree at the University of Melbourne, I began working in a private practice and also ran my own physiotherapy clinic in the spareroom of a local GP on saturdays. The room was small and needed to be a functional physio space, so storage was an issue. Around this time, I caught up with my high school mate and in response to my workspace problem we developed web-based software to eliminate the paper trail. That’s the point at which I realised that software engineering could be put to good use in healthcare. Following 15 years of working as a physiotherapist, I decided to enter the healthtech space. 

The Australian tech startup environment is not as developed as Silicon Valley. This means it’s normally not enough to have a plan on a piece of paper and an Ivy League education to get funding, even if it’s a really good idea. Investors want to know beforehand that new concepts will solve problems and lead to something that sells. You need to have an MVP or a tested prototype to show investors that what you’re working with is basically tried-and-true. 

I quickly realised I was spending a lot of my own money paying other people to develop working prototypes. At the same time, it was tricky to find technical co-founders. There’s a general shortage of software engineers and developers in Australia, but they’re even more scarce in the startup environment. I eventually thought to myself, “I’m not going to do this anymore. I can’t keep moving back-and-forth, it’s just too expensive and time consuming”. That’s when I realised that I needed to write code for myself. I made a positive decision to get the skills and know-how needed to realise my own MVP. 

Having made the decision to upskill, I looked at what was on offer and decided to join Academy Xi. The choice really paid off – Albert’s been a great instructor and given me the confidence to think critically about my own software designs. I test the architecture for any strengths and weaknesses, and then make simple but effective decisions about what needs to be added or subtracted.    

It’s been a few months since I graduated and I’m now fully equipped to create my own MVPs. It’s honestly been life changing – the fact that I can now call myself a qualified software engineer. It means I’m less reliant on other people’s skills and as a result, my career’s become much more streamlined. 

What were the biggest challenges and rewards that came with the course?

The prospect of studying online represented one of the biggest obstacles for me. You encounter a lot of stories about software developers and engineers self-learning on platforms such as YouTube and Udemy. There’s this question in your mind, “could I learn all this for free on YouTube?” Honestly, the answer is no, you probably can’t. YouTube videos ‘show and tell’, but the relationship ends there. This course distinguishes itself through its involvement with real people. There’s a supportive peer-to-peer network, and you also get unlimited 1:1 mentoring sessions.

Student Spotlight: Barry Nguyen Quote1

The time I spent with my mentor Albert was critical. It’s not a very content rich course – it’s more like a process of problem solving. Albert did a great job of guiding me through that.
My mentor sessions with Albert helped me fix problems before they grew, which meant I could confidently move on to the next thing.

I didn’t know initially that you could book time with your mentor every day, but when I realised this, Albert made himself available to answer my questions as they arose. At this point, my progress accelerated rapidly. This training is distinguished from other courses through its immediate feedback, if you choose to get it. I think that’s what really sets it apart – having that high level of support.

Because modern industries are prone to transformation, I think lots of people need to be prepared to reset themselves at some stage in their career. I would guess that this is one of the key traits that Academy Xi looks for in course participants – that willingness to take on the responsibilities that enable them to effect change in their careers. It’s a hard thing to pull-off, especially when you have other big responsibilities, but as Elon Musk puts it, sometimes you just need to ‘chew broken glass’.

Even with children and a full-time job, I actually completed the whole full-time course in five months. Factoring in my situation, I was really pleased with this timeline. Definitely one of the biggest rewards was being able to enhance my career and not neglect all my other life commitments. The course delivery is considerately designed for people who have lots going on. There’s also a part-time 10 month version of the same course. This might be a better option for anyone who wants that balance of career development and lifestyle. If you’ve got the drive and you’re willing to plan your time, everything you need to succeed is available.

This training is distinguished from other courses through its immediate feedback, if you choose to get it. I think that’s what really sets it apart – having that high level of support.”  – Barry Nguyen

 Why did you choose Academy Xi and what about the course experience did you value most?

We had worked with Academy Xi in the UI/UX space at my old startup and the projects really impressed me. That’s the main reason why I picked you guys over others – I’d already  collaborated with your students and the work was of a really high standard. It made the decision very easy to make. 

This whole experience has given me greater appreciation for the people giving others the opportunity to learn and develop. I started the course with a well-established career but was keen to diversify. My time with Academy Xi not only enabled me to build the tech skills I needed, but also helped me coordinate a roadmap that made diversification a reachable goal. Funnily enough, I’m back as an intern now. Sometimes I feel like I’ve taken three steps back to go ten steps forward! It’s very humbling and I don’t take anything for granted. I’m adding to my skills and network daily with experienced professionals who are also more than happy to mentor. 

These days, my approach is to always keep a beginner’s mindset. The need to remain open to new ideas and possibilities never goes away. It seems to me that too many people gather a bit of knowledge or skill and then call themselves an expert. Whenever I hear someone describe themselves as an expert, alarm bells start ringing! I think a true expert realises that expertise is not something you arrive at. It’s an ongoing process – you can never know too much. 

I’m now noticing that companies in startup environments are struggling to find Software Engineers. Mostly because they’re demanding more and more money. Experienced engineers are often ridiculously well paid and enjoy the added luxury of a remote nine-to-five job. Luckily, the investment is growing and there are plenty of lower and medium tier roles available, which means anyone with the right skills can get their foot on the ladder. My situation is a big opportunity. Hopefully I can show others that you can make the leap from seemingly unrelated roles, like mine as a clinician, into tech.

Do you have any advice on course content and how you approached your work?

I think it takes a very clear, logical mind, and grit to complete this course. Maybe people who have been exposed to this type of learning before are more likely to succeed. They begin with a clearer understanding of what the course is going to be.

My experience on the course taught me that you can’t afford to work in an environment where you’ll be easily distracted. You really have to block-out your schedule, set-up the right conditions and keep a strong sense of how and when you work best. For those periods when you’re studying, it needs to be undistracted, deep, high-value work. This course requires an advanced level of critical analysis, problem solving and lateral thinking, so make sure you give yourself the time and space to perform these tasks to the best of your abilities.

The course is also pretty condensed – there’s a lot of learning crammed into five months. What you’re doing is really important and you can’t afford to take it lightly. Other than that, I would say, “don’t be limiting in your beliefs, just do it!”

How did you get on with your mentor and cohort?

Albert has a strong and sincere desire for all in his cohort to succeed. You guys did a great job finding him! Everybody wants a mentor who is available and willing to commit time outside of scheduled classes. Everyone needs feedback to progress in their learning. Albert was always happy to discuss my work and assist me with any problems that I had throughout the course. He’s not only knowledgeable, but also passionate. These characteristics really made the difference – it was obvious that he genuinely enjoyed working with the cohort and helping everybody produce their best work. He’s also a very holistic person and encouraged us to manage our wellbeing. Balancing hard work, health and happiness is probably the key to long-term success, and Albert made sure we kept that balance a priority.

Albert believes in long-term relationships that last beyond the five months. He’s still in contact today and pleased to help with my career as it’s unfolding. It’s like being part of a good school alumni where you make lasting friendships. The whole cohort collaborated on so many interesting projects together – we worked through hardships and brought things to fruition together. In the end, you walk away with connections that couldn’t be made at a networking event. The relationships are formed over time and really are built to last.

In the end, you walk away with connections that couldn’t be made at a networking event. The relationships are formed over time and really are built to last. ”  – Barry Nguyen

Why would you recommend the Software Engineering Transform course to startup founders and entrepreneurs?

For me, the course made a lot of financial sense. It cost close to $15,000, which was tax deductible, but gave me the knowledge and skills to develop new MVPs for the rest of my career. Gone are the days when I’ll be paying someone $50,000 to design one MVP without any guarantee that their work will match my initial ideas. For that reason alone, I believe most startup entrepreneurs will get real value for money with this course.

Student Spotlight: Barry Nguyen Quote2

If you’re serious about creating a startup that succeeds, you need to have the tools to at least begin building it from the ground up. This doesn’t mean that a CTO or technical co-founder will do all the coding alone – it’s more about making sure that you have more than just soft skills. People always talk about soft skills, but they won’t always be enough to get the job done.

As Sam Altman, former President of Y Combinator advises in his blog post to aspiring tech founders, “Non-technical founder? Learn to hack.”

My qualification with Academy Xi has left me feeling less at risk – upskilling is one of the best ways to keep your tech contribution relevant and valuable. It’s also given me the confidence to follow through with my own software designs. I’ve found that having the ability to do certain things changes the conversations I have with people. I spoke to a venture capitalist the other day and he said, “You learned that? You created that?”. It has the potential to completely change what you’re working on and who you’re working with.

What’s next for you, Barry? 

Well, I’m finishing my internship and planning on doing everything I can to help my company succeed. The ultimate goal is to be an inspiration to others and create a notable Aussie company in health technology of a similar impact to the local startup ecosystem like Canva and Atlassian. I’m already building out my MVP and steadily getting that ready to launch. 

As I go, I’ll also be raising money for the project and drumming-up support through skilled partnerships. It would be great to involve Academy Xi at some stage, so watch this space!

Academy Xi Blog

FAQs: Software Engineering

By Academy Xi

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We’ve compiled this list of questions that are often asked about Software Engineering. We hope that it will give you the answers you are looking for. 

Overview of Software Engineering

Physical computing devices, such as mobile phones or laptops are referred to as ‘hardware’ and the set of instructions that tells the device what to do are known as ‘software’. 

Software engineering is the process of analysing user needs and then designing, developing and maintaining systems that instruct anything from small applications to large online platforms that will satisfy these needs through the use of software programming languages.

Software engineers design, develop and maintain systems and software for businesses and organisations. This software could be desktop programs like Spotify, or a mobile and web application such as Gmail or Facebook. They also build network control systems and operating systems. Their job is to meet the requirements of the users’ specifications as best as possible.

Both of these roles can build software from scratch, but ultimately software engineers work on a larger scale. 

 

Developers are responsible for creating programs, working with programmers to design and test them and their project scope is generally a lot more limited in comparison to an engineer. Software engineers focus on structural design and often collaborate with IT, operations and development staff to design and maintain programs, architecture, large scale data stores and cloud-based systems.

These two roles describe similar areas of expertise, but they’re not the same.

Web developers build websites from the ground up using programming languages such as JavaScript or Java. In contrast, software engineers are responsible for creating more complex applications and programs for computers and devices, which are used as critical systems for organisations. They create, conceptualise, program, document, test and upgrade software and their components.

Specific software is needed in almost every industry. It can provide a wide range of functions including automation of tasks to improve any organisation’s efficiency and reduce the workload of teams.

With over 5 billion mobile users in the world, all of these devices function via operating systems – software with multiple functions.

The scope of work that software engineers can be involved with is endless. With almost every industry using software in some form or another, an engineer could be involved in developing anything from a trading platform for investment bankers to creating systems that track energy production and consumption around the world. 

Software engineers are needed across all industries, including healthcare, education, retail, government agencies, human resources, space exploration – you name it, there’s a need for software engineers.

A technology stack is a list of all the technology services used to build and run one single application. Tech stacks communicate a lot of information about how the application is built and are divided between the back-end (server side) and front-end (client side). Website development tends to be separated into three focus areas: front-end, back-end and full-stack.

Also known as ‘client side’ development, this is where the focus is on what a user visually sees in their browser or app. Front-end programming or development is the ‘look and feel’ of a site and languages used include HTML, CSS, Javascript, JQuery. 

Front-end programming jobs:

  • Front end developer
  • Front end Designer 
  • Web Designer
  • UX UI Designer

Referred to as back-end development or ‘server side’, it usually consists of three parts: a server, an application and a database. Users can’t see the back-end work, but this code is what communicates the database information to the browser. Back-end languages include: Java, PHP, Ruby on Rails, Python, .Net

Back-end programming jobs:

  • Back-end developer
  • Java developer
  • Software developer
  • Full-stack developer

Working on the server-side of web programming, full-stack developers can also fluently speak the front-end languages that control how content looks on a site’s user-facing side. They’re the jack of all trades.

Software engineering skills and tools

On the tech side, software engineers need the following skills:

  • Coding (the most common language being JavaScript) and being able to code for mobile devices. Python, Java and Ruby are also popular languages
  • Problem solving skills to debug and fix errors in code that cause unexpected behaviour
  • Testing skills (handling untested or broken code)
  • Ability to learn new languages and concepts quickly
  • Familiarity with database technologies such as SQL
  • Familiarity with programming frameworks
  • Understanding of modern software architecture and patterns

It’s not all about tech in this role. Soft skills are also important and include:

  • Collaboration 
  • Communication
  • Empathy
  • Critical thinking
  • Leadership 

Software Engineering career

It is indeed. With an acute shortage of IT talent, many HR professionals are finding it difficult to fill software engineering roles and the demand is only going to continue to increase, with software jobs in Australia predicted to grow by 23.4% to 2024. (Labour Market Information Portal) and by 30% in the next five years:

In Australia, the most common salary is $100,000-$120,000 for software engineers, with income varying between the states and territories. Visit this page on Seek.com.au to view the differences depending on your location, but also keep in mind that many software engineering roles can be performed remotely. 

Learning Software Engineering

If you are looking for a quick fix career change with no need for motivation and commitment, software engineering is not for you. For that matter, not many career changes are going to suit you if you aren’t willing to apply yourself to learning new skills.

At a base level, you will need to learn how to code, which is essentially a language. Most programming languages have fewer than fifty keywords and will be in comparison to learning a foreign language, easier to pick up. 

Software Engineering will be easier for some than others, but if you enjoy a challenge and take to coding, it would well be for you! 

Chat to our experienced Course Advisors to see if Software Engineering is for you

There is a massive industry demand and an acute shortage of IT Talent globally. Software engineers are highly sought after in Australia, with full-stack developers in particular being cited as one of the most in-demand and well paid IT roles. If you are after career opportunities across a range of industries with solid income and future job security, software engineering is the way to go.

There are many options to get qualified as a software engineer. Traditional universities offer Computer Science and Software Engineering degrees, which often take 3-4 years to complete. 

There is increasingly less expectation for software engineers to be university qualified, with many employers, including the likes of Google, looking more to skills and experience than a degree in computer science. 

As a result, more people are engaging in shorter, condensed bootcamp-style courses to get skilled in a much shorter period of time, with the added bonus of these courses being extremely laser focused on job readiness and practical skills. 

Academy Xi offers intensive, job-focussed training in software engineering and front-end web development

This industry-vetted, bootcamp-style training delivered by Academy Xi is designed to completely transform your career, teaching in-demand practical skills that will get you job-ready. 

While some are keen to teach themselves the art of software engineering, many benefit greatly from having the structure of a training program, particularly one that is highly practical and hands-on. 

A computer science degree could take a minimum of 3 years to complete, whereas training at a private college could see you graduating job ready in software engineering in a much shorter period of time.

At Academy Xi we offer our Software Engineering (Transform) training in the following formats:

Academy Xi offers job-focused software development courses designed to take you from beginner to employed, within months, with plenty of hands-on coding practice.

Academy Xi has leveraged curriculum from New York based tech education provider, Flatiron School, to bring you the Software Engineering: Transform course. 

Flatiron School has an impressive track record of delivering quality education for 8+ years. They have successfully graduated over 2,500 students and have won multiple awards for their proprietary tech education programs. 

With curriculum built by Flatiron School, the Software Engineering: Transform course from Academy Xi is designed to completely transform your career, teaching in-demand practical skills that will get you job-ready.

Some form of training is a must to enter the industry. Today’s career changers are increasingly looking to get skilled via intensive programming short courses or bootcamps, as opposed to traditional 4-year degrees.

By training in Software Engineering at Academy Xi, you will graduate job-ready and have access to Career Support at the completion of your training. With a 90% placement rate of graduates we are confident that we can work with you to land your first role as a Software Engineer. 

There is plenty of information available online to learn any programming language and to begin building and testing your own software. A few good resources include:

Many people, however, prefer the structure of a software engineering course that has been designed by industry professionals to ensure that you gain the skills and experience that will enable you to graduate ready to seek employment.

Academy Xi offers training in Software Engineering  as both part-time and full-time options. You can access course details below.

If you would like to discuss training options, please feel free to get in touch with our experienced Course Advisors. 

All of Academy Xi training is now offered online. We teach job focused software development courses designed to take you from beginner to employed within months, with plenty of hands-on coding practice.

Academy Xi has campuses in Sydney and Melbourne, but in light of the COVID pandemic all training has moved online. We pride ourselves on offering students a socially engaged learning experience

Academy Xi has campuses in Sydney and Melbourne, but in light of the COVID pandemic all training has moved online. We pride ourselves on offering students a socially engaged learning experience

Software Engineering course with Academy Xi

We teach two programming languages, one for each front-end and back-end plus a host of frameworks and tools, which, used together, can help to build a web application.

Front-end:

  • Languages: JavaScript, HTML and CSS
  • Frameworks: React and Redux

Back-end:

  • Language: Ruby (programming language) supported by Rails (framework), also called Ruby on Rails
  • Database tool: SQL 
  • Version control with Git

Both Ruby and Python are object oriented languages, so you can achieve the same results with both, however there are a few reasons we teach Ruby over Python:

  • Ruby is a language recommended for beginners because it reads remarkably like English
  • Ruby  is readable and efficient, making it much easier to get comfortable with than some other languages. 
  • It’s also open-source, so you’ll have access to plenty of tools and a community of other developers, all for free. The Ruby community is extremely supportive and an amazing resource for beginners.
  • And perhaps most importantly, it’s flexible: the language is used by plenty of companies (Airbnb, GitHub, Hulu, Kickstarter, etc.) and gives you a solid foundation to branch out into other languages later.

Once you are well versed with Ruby, learning other languages including Python will come more easily to you. 

Ruby is a programming language and is supported by Rails, which is the framework. Together they are known as ‘Ruby on Rails’.

Ruby on Rails is a web application framework. It is a collection of shortcuts written in Ruby that lets you build websites really quickly.

Yes. The Academy Xi Software Engineering Transform training is approximately 1000 hours of learning, to ensure that you are really well trained. Students spend over half their time coding and we developed the course with New York based Flatiron School, who have won multiple awards from Career Karma and Course Report.

We want you to understand that this is an intensive course that will train you to take on software engineering as a career, so you will need to put in some hard work. There will be an element of self study, however, you’ll get loads of support from your industry-trained mentors who have years of experience in software engineering. Your online experience will also include multiple weekly online classes with your mentor and classmates and unlimited 1:1 sessions with your mentor.

  • This course is built to really teach you how to code. 
  • You’ll spend over 50% of your time on coding, practical activities
  • From hundreds of labs (coding exercises) to 5 projects of varying complexity, you’ll be constantly coding
  • Not only will you build code, but you’ll also learn how to debug errors 
  • Real client project work: Once you graduate, you also have the option to work on a JavaScript project for a real client’s website, in a safe local environment.
  • Reading is a crucial part of learning to be a developer, so that has been built into the design of the course. You can expect to spend 50% of your time reading, and 50% practicing. 
  • There are certainly plenty of free resources online and lots of people teach themselves, BUT what we offer is feedback and support while you are doing it – which makes the process more efficient, and effective.
  1. There will be multiple Live Sessions with your mentor which will be a little lecturing, but mostly live practice and discussing practical activities
  2. You can get unlimited mentor support when you need it (within office hours)
  • It’s an easier way to learn a complex topic – start small and keep building in complexity: Another difference is that the activities, projects and assessment are built to start small, adding specific skills along the way, increasing a complex range of capability all at once. You could try to do that by yourself online, but it would be hard to do.
  • Importantly, the course has been refined over 8 years of delivery – so you’re essentially paying for something that works and has been proven to be successful. The way this course is taught has been optimised over and over and over again to ensure student success. 

So you get all these benefits if you choose to sign up, instead of trying to tackle a complex subject by yourself.

  • One thing employers are looking for is your GitHub profile – it’s basically a Software Engineer’s version of a portfolio.
  • Any person around the world can consult your code and see how you work without having to carry a laptop, a hard drive, or any other device. 
  • It is the best way to showcase your coding projects in a fast and professional way.
  • As this course consists of 50% of the time spent coding, each line of code you write is published to your GitHub profile – which you can share with employers to showcase your coding skills. 
  • In fact, your final capstone project is designed specifically to demonstrate the breadth of your skills to potential employers.
  • Git is a version control system which is distributed for free. It’s open-source, fast, and efficient.
  • GitHub is the web platform for hosting your code using Git’s system.
  • We have an entire Career Support Team that will work with you to help you secure a job offer after graduation. 
  • You’ll get personalised support to refine your CV and LinkedIn profile, help in preparing for interviews and access to our network of employers. 
  • It’s a collaborative process – you have to look for opportunities, put in the effort and engage with your Career Coach. 
  • We’re really proud of our graduate employment rate – over 90% of our graduates have secured a job offer within 180 days of graduation, in their chosen field.
  • The full time course can be completed in 5 months, and the part-time in 10 months. 
  • The course content across full time and part time is identical. 
  • The difference is the time commitment – whether you can commit to studying full time (around 45-50 hours a week) or part time (20-25 hours a week). 
  • If you’re studying the full-time course, we’ll assume you’re available between 9 to 5 and can attend live video sessions and 1:1 on demand sessions with your mentor during that time. 
  • That’s why if you’re currently working full time, we recommend that you study the 10 month time course – it spreads learning out over a longer period and does not have any scheduled activities during work hours.

The course is delivered 100% online via our best-in-class learning platform. You’ll learn through a combination of: 

  • Self study (pre-readings, videos, etc.) 
  • Mentor-led weekly online classes (4 per week for full time students, 2 per week for part time) 
  • Individual project work
  • Individual coding practice labs and final project 
  • Group client project (optional)
  • No prior coding experience is required, you can enter this course as a beginner and graduate ready for a Software Development job. 
  • As this course is designed for beginners, you’ll learn everything from the fundamentals of computer science to actually writing code. 
  • Any coding experience you bring will be a bonus – but it’s definitely not required.
  • It’s a 2 step process, but entirely non-technical. 

Step 1: Admissions Interview: This is a chance for us to get to know you, your motivations for studying this course and whether the course is the right fit for you. 

Step 2: As per the course advisor’s discretion, you may be asked to perform a short logic test in your own time. Don’t worry, there’s no coding experience required. This simple assessment will help us understand your thought process, to ensure you are well-placed to succeed in the course.

  • Allow 1-4 hours for this test.
  • This course is spread over 5 core modules. 
  • At the end of each module, you’ll work on an assessment project. 
  • You’ll work solo on all your course project work- that’s 5 individual projects to add to your Github portfolio!  
    • Students aren’t grouped in these projects, but they could discuss their ideas with each other and the mentor but at the end it’s their own work they would have to submit.
    • In the client project phase, will be grouping students and would be a collaborative project – teaching important concepts like peer programming.
  • You’ll need to complete each module project to a satisfactory level before you progress to the next module. 
  • You may be required to do some re-work if your mentor determines that you’re not ready to progress to the next module yet. 
  • Operating systems: Laptop running the latest version of either Mac OSX or Windows 10
  • Memory: 8GB+ of RAM
  • Hard drive: 10GB+ of free hard drive space (to install and set up programs and applications needed to study)
  • Hardware: Working keyboard, trackpad/mouse and display
  • Admin access: Yes – to install and configure programs
  • Internet access: Yes
  • Webcam: Yes – to participate in mandatory live sessions
  • Chromebooks, tablets, and smartphones will not work.
  • Laptops should have the latest version of its operating system and be no more than 4-5 years old 

Our Tech and Data courses range from $4,500 – $14,500 RRP. Speak to a course advisor to know more about the cost of specific courses. 

Why study Software Engineering at Academy Xi?

Industry vetted curriculum

Software Engineering training at Academy Xi was created by experienced learning designers, in partnership with industry practitioners. The curriculum is open source, with students able to suggest changes quickly and easily from the GitHub repository. We update the curriculum regularly based on this feedback and real world changes, ensuring content stays relevant in a fast- changing industry.

Become a full-stack engineer

Increase your employment prospects by gaining the full breadth of skills across the tech stack. You’ll master programming fundamentals with JavaScript and Ruby, and build applications quickly with Ruby on Rails (favoured by popular tech companies like Airbnb, MyFitnessPal, SoundCloud and others).

Hands-on coding practice

Implement technical learning from the get go, with hundreds of practical labs (coding exercises), and over 50% of your time spent coding. You’ll collaborate with peers to work on group projects of increasing complexity and deliver your own solo web development project at the end of the course.

Build your GitHub profile

Display your newly acquired Software Engineering skills through 5 assessment projects and your personal Github profile, created as you progress through the course, demonstrating your practical skills and approach to future employers.

Bonus client project

After you graduate from the course, you’ll have the opportunity to work with JavaScript using a real client brand. Get a feel for what it’s like to use your coding skills on a real-world website or app, solving problems Front-end Developers face on a daily basis.

Supported by leading industry experts

Your course Mentor is a seasoned practitioner with extensive experience in the tech field, as well as teaching. You’ll meet your Mentor regularly through live video sessions for group discussions and Q&A.

Unlimited 1:1 mentor support

Get access to 1:1 sessions with your Mentor to receive personalised feedback and specific guidance as you progress through the course.

Robust learning platform

Study on a comprehensive learning platform using real developer tools. You’ll set up a real development environment on day 1 and use a professional command line and Git-based workflow, so you truly learn by doing.

Tailored career support

Get job-ready and land your dream role, like 90% of our graduates to date. Over 24 weeks, our Career Support team will work with you to strengthen your CV and online brand, prepare for mock interviews, search for job opportunities and much more.

Network of hiring managers

Lots of fantastic brands are looking to hire graduates just like you… And we’ve got the community to connect you with them, helping you land your dream job.

Cohort based learning

Never feel like you’re studying alone. Start and progress through the course at the same pace as all other students. Regularly interact with your Mentor and classmates via Zoom, Slack and Q&A forums to discuss current topics and work in groups on projects, replicating the collaborative approach required in the workplace.

Earn an industry-recognised certificate

Receive a Certificate of Completion as official recognition of your competencies, theoretical knowledge and practical skills in Software Engineering. As our courses are trusted by organisations and recruiters across Australia, adding this digital credential to your CV and LinkedIn profile can greatly boost your employment prospects.

Academy Xi Blog

Overriding ‘business as usual’ thinking

By Academy Xi

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Managers are constantly on the lookout for ways to drive more thoughtful decisions, increase collaboration and achieve better results for their team. Good leaders understand that success can’t be attributed to one person. Instead, high-quality, valuable output is the result of a collaborative culture. In strong teams, foundational skills exist across all members – that is, a shared language, set of practices, tools and mindset.

How can managers proactively provide their teams with these kinds of foundational capabilities? What kinds of skills are going to keep them ahead of the curve and their competitors?

Digital: Keeping up with the pace of change

One of the biggest changes sweeping through organisations and teams right now is digital transformation. In the wake of organisation-wide digital change, managers are faced with ensuring that their team isn’t left behind. Digital Imposter Syndrome’ is real. Members of your team will undoubtedly be feeling it (but may not be confident enough to raise their hand and call it out). Standing still as a team or business can give competitors the upper hand. It is important that your staff are advancing, which will ensure you remain competitive.

So why doesn’t deploying new technology alone result in gains to efficiency, productivity, engagement and worker happiness? The answer is simple: it isn’t about the technology. The true benefits of advanced technologies can only be realised if we know how to use them to their fullest potential. We often call this “digital literacy.”

What can managers do to help their team up their digital game?

  • Instill a culture where you don’t expect your team to become digital masters, but you do expect them to be able to have a conversation with one
  • Give them the tools they need to make better digital decisions
  • Invite them to participate in the digital roadmap for your team
  • Equip them with practical skills to engage meaningfully in digital projects

Data: Making better business decisions

Data” as a concept can feel intimidating. It can leave those who do not understand it feeling like they cannot understand it. Although this might sound silly, this is a serious business constraint as it is at odds with the value businesses are placing on data. Companies are investing in data like they invest in physical assets, IP, and real estate. When demystifying data feels like a challenge too great, teams run the risk of falling behind and basing decisions on assumptions and gut-feel.

The aim is to make your team comfortable enough with data in order to better inform your decision-making processes. Your team is unlikely to go on to become data scientists or statisticians – but that is fine. Data literacy is the goal.

What can managers do to help their team up their data game?

  • Provide the tools required to foster a culture of data-driven storytelling and decision-making
  • Give them the training they need to be able to interpret, pull insights from and use data to make smarter business decisions
  • Illustrate the importance of data and the role it plays in the broader team and organisational context 

Design: Going beyond the status quo

Human-Centred Design and Design Thinking are tried and tested approaches to unleashing dormant creativity. Simply put, they are both mindsets. They boil down to the idea that we should always make products, services and processes with the end user’s needs in mind. Customer-centricity is a close cousin and shares a lot of similarities with these two design approaches.

How might leaders take a design-led approach to rethinking how they engage their customers, employees and partners? They might start with better understanding the needs of their stakeholders. Through this process, they might realise that a new offering may be better suited to the needs of their customer. New business models may be brought to light. It is all about shedding old assumptions in order to bring about any number of ways to innovate.

What can managers do to help their team up their design game?

  • Give your team permission to explore new areas by removing existing ‘business as usual’ beliefs
  • Train them with practical skills they need to systemise innovation (empathy, willingness to challenge the status quo, space to fail)
  • Kick-start a culture of continuous learning by defining a shared language around design, innovation and creativity

Insanity is often described as “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.” 

High-performing teams engage in continuous learning. Their leaders acknowledge existing skills gaps and proactively set about plugging them. These teams also ‘speak the same language’. They harness a collective mindset and toolkit to solve complex business problems. 

As Forbes points out, it’s things like problem-solving, communication, collaboration, creativity and innovation that are important right now. These are the skills that modern leaders need to foster in their teams in order to achieve success.

Feel like your team could use some help in overriding BAU thinking?

We have training solutions to help managers shift the way that their teams work at every stage of their journey: introductory courses, deeper-dive upskilling workshops through to bespoke programs co-designed to address specific needs. Reach out to discuss your training needs with us.