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Academy Xi Blog

Can remote work & the great resignation ‘go the distance’?

By Academy Xi

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Following record-breaking demand for remote work, online educators and training providers have galvanised in response to ‘The Great Resignation’.

Supplying a sudden demand for employees with a digital skillset, these companies are preparing a ‘next generation’ workforce for the possibilities of remote work, helping millions stay ahead of the curve.  

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Conducting research at the start of 2019, employment website Indeed found that 68% of Australian employers had remote workers on their staff. Of these employers, 69% claimed that increased productivity was the biggest benefit of remote working, followed by improved morale, lower absenteeism and reduced employee turnover.

Data for Indeed’s survey was captured nearly a year before Coronavirus came into effect, with Australia’s first case confirmed on the 25th of January 2020 and restrictions beginning a few months later in March. A world of change has been presided over since the report’s publication. A more up-to-date study would document a much larger proportion of Australian companies facilitating remote roles. 

Large parts of Australian industry were locked down in response to the pandemic, with the Australian Computer Society (ACS) reporting the loss of 850,000 jobs throughout March and April in 2020. Meanwhile, Australia’s borders were closed to non-residents as of the 20th of March in the same year and the education sector was dramatically impacted. ACS pinpoints education as the nation’s fourth largest export earner. Like so many other companies and institutions, Australian education and training providers with a progressive mindset have upped their resourcefulness and continued to provide in-demand skills solutions online. 

 

A Remote Possibility

Though homeworking has been a cultural and economic necessity throughout coronavirus restrictions, it seems more than likely that a number of businesses who’ve sampled its benefits will move toward a larger remit of remote work permanently. 

As well as the personnel improvements noted by Indeed, a remote workforce offers the added financial incentive of less bricks-and-mortar office space. However, not every company’s activities will have translated well into an online infrastructure and some will revert to business-as-usual operations as soon as possible.

But what about companies that already had their sights set on remote horizons before the pandemic? For those businesses that made the leap into fully remote operations, it seems unlikely that many will find themselves looking back once the lockdown landscape is cleared.

A large number of organisations will have tested elements of a remote system throughout the pandemic and found it not only cost-effective, but also highly productive. This means many companies will emerge from the pandemic determined to maintain or even build out hybrid structures, with certain roles and responsibilities fulfilled from afar.

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Teams of people might have found virtual meetings to be an unfamiliar substitute for in-person interactions. However, many will have realised that online meets work perfectly well and will continue to hold them because it saves time and money. For similar reasons, executives might think twice before booking a long distance flight on company expenses. Many top level professionals will hold future board meetings virtually, thrashing out deals and wielding their power in crisp white shirts and wrinkled pyjama bottoms. 

Mismatched clothing has become an in-joke shared between remote workers throughout the pandemic. It’s a sign of the times, when everyone has thrown everything they can muster together, or done unusual things to deal with unusual circumstances. 

There’s a widespread notion that the pandemic has made the vast majority of people resourceful and adaptable. That said, the spectrum of social and economic effects brought about by Coronavirus exist on a scale. Nobody could reasonably claim that a pyjama wearing executive has been pushed too far beyond their comfort zone. 

Countless workers employed in retail, hospitality, tourism and leisure industries will have found themselves in tough situations. It comes as no surprise that many have quit these kinds of industries and professions, never to return.

 

‘The Great Resignation’

A recent US Labor Department report documented that 740,000 employees working in leisure and hospitality industries resigned in April 2021. These people had staffed diners, roadside motels, sports bars and theme parks, before the venues of the iconic American experience were transformed into a temporary ghost town. Many of these employees have taken themselves to a newer haunt, which is very much alive and kicking.

Digital industries and an expanding online workspace have been the driving force behind ‘The Great Resignation’, also known as ‘The Big Quit’. A record-breaking 4 million Americans left their jobs throughout April this year, with a large proportion of them leaving low-paid, inflexible roles and seeking to reposition themselves in digital careers (US Labor Department Report, 2021). 

More recent statistics indicate that the mindset of the quit movement has been influential in all levels of employment. A poll conducted by Forbes in late June 2021 found that nearly 40% of white-collar workers would move to another company offering remote work rather than go back to an old office job. Forbes notes that “even highly sought after companies like Apple are scrambling to avoid mass-resignations from return-to-office policies”.

In a similar vein, a survey captured by insurance and financial services giant Prudential established that “one in three American workers would not want to work for an employer that required them to work on site full time” (Forbes, 2021). With this statistic in mind, Prudential vice chair Rob Falzon confessed, “If there’s one thing that keeps me up at night, it’s the talent flight risk.” 

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A precise percentage of how many resignees are following new career paths into the digital space will only become clearer with time. However, this mass exodus of staff, which stretches far beyond the US and into global employment markets, has been fundamentally linked to the enhanced possibilities of remote work. 

A 2021 report by Harvard Business School examined the records of 9 million employees from 4,000 companies, discovering that staff in tech and healthcare industries were most likely to resign. This is especially true for employees of companies that experienced increased demand for products and services. It doesn’t seem too much of a stretch to conclude that some of these staff members must have felt overworked, or undervalued.  

Many industry specialists believe that a version of the Great Resignation is already taking shape in Australia, with the conditions for a major employment shift already aligning. A recent large-scale salary survey by Hays, a worldwide recruitment specialist with offices in most of Australia’s major cities, concluded 40% of Australians are seriously considering career changes. Interviewed by Yahoo Finance, Hays Australia managing director, Nick Deligiannis, forecasts the Australian big quit in these terms.

There are signs that there could be a ‘Great Resignation’ in Australia soon, too. The pandemic has been a rude intrusion to many Australians’ career plans. They have put their career plans on hold to help their organisation through the crisis. Now, they are focused on their career again and have begun prioritising advancement. But while career progression is valued, just 16 per cent of employees expect to receive a promotion in the next 12 months.” – Nick Deligiannis (Hays Australia)

All this represents a power-shift, as a perfect storm of pandemic conditions is changing the hearts and minds of an Australian workforce. On a global scale, more people than ever before want and expect flexible working conditions, as well as better all round lifestyles. In some cases, they’re prepared to turn their backs on senior roles with blue chip companies in order to make this happen.

Staying Ahead of the Curve

For anyone who values their own work-life balance, resigning, upskilling and pursuing a remote career is a process that’s perfectly relatable. What’s trickier to understand is the timing with which a whole raft of employees are throwing themselves into a sea change of career diversification.        

The Great Resignation was coined by Texas A&M Management Professor, Anthony Klotz, whose research acknowledges that people voluntarily quitting jobs in large numbers amid an ongoing recession represents a longstanding economic trend ‘turned on its head’. In short, people have always resigned in greater numbers when the economy is stable and job opportunities are relatively high. In times of recession, people tend to ‘stay put’ and resignation rates drop and remain low. 

From December 2000 to the beginning of the pandemic in 2020, resignation among the total US workforce never surpassed 2.4% (The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, 2021). The first year of the pandemic played out as expected, with a seven-year resignation low of 1.6% throughout 2020. From the Spring of this year, everything changed and long standing resignation records have been shattered, peaking at 4%. In the eye of the nation’s worst ever economic storm, more Americans than ever before have lept ship and searched for new opportunities in digital industries.     

The Great Resignation is a clear indication that many employees are becoming more proactive and savvy in their career moves. 49% of students that study with Academy Xi expect to secure a new role at a different company upon completion of their studies. Many of our students have realised that more enjoyable and stable opportunities have already presented and will continue to arise as the effects of the pandemic ease off. 

When Covid conditions pass completely, hiring rates are anticipated to continue moving upward, following a steady trajectory in the medium-term and replicating the growth patterns of previous post-recession economies. By upskilling through workshops and preparing to latch on to an upturn in remote work opportunities, millions of people are realising the value of staying ahead of the curve.  

A Great Resignation thought-piece article published in recent weeks by Forbes has argued that too many people are resigning without a new role lined-up. In doing so, they’re throwing themselves into limbo and losing the salary bargaining leverage that comes with keeping their current job contract. There’s a simple but failsafe solution to this problem, whereby people seeking better work opportunities can re-skill part-time, enter into the jobs market formally prepared for a new role and hand in their notice once a new position is secured. Before you make the leap into a digital career, get the skills and experience needed to land that new role and hit the ground running.

  

Realising A Workforce’s Digital Potential 

What does an increase in remote work opportunities mean for the next generation of employees? In short, it means absolutely everything. Remote workers have a better chance of balancing hard work, health and happiness – that all important trio of variables that contribute to individual productivity.

Throughout the pandemic, companies and employees have learned that embracing the overlapping nature of work life and life-in-general can bring about real results. Here, it’s useful to circle back to the findings of the Indeed report. The numbers don’t lie. Those people who are able to fulfil at least some of their job’s remit remotely tend to be more productive. The flexible scheduling of remote work also gives people a better chance to meet all of life’s other responsibilities. As a result, they’ll likely be more content in their work and remain loyal to their company. This is backed-up by the reduced staff turnover and absenteeism reported by Indeed.

When properly supported by training and skills development, digital industries give people more time and space to evolve their careers, perform their best work and realise their full professional potential.

Man behind laptop while team works around him

What does this look like? Well, some people like to work in bursts of an hour, broken-up by ten-minute periods of lying on the ground and doing everything possible to think of nothing. Meditating in the office should not be frowned-upon socially but does represent a trip hazard. Others are more zen working at 1am, after returning from a 24hour convenience store with a bottle of Mountain Dew, ready to start a graveyard shift of coding.

Giving talented people greater freedom to work in ways that suit their lifestyles will normally ensure maximum individual output and high quality work, helping a company as a whole achieve a healthier bottom line. As long as a remote employee manages their time, prioritises, keeps teammates ‘in the loop’ and hits deadlines, no one in a senior position will spend too much time thinking about how and when things got done.

It comes as no surprise that increased freedom means trust is a core component of the employer-employee relationships which oversee remote roles. The starting assumption will be that people are just as productive somewhere else as they are in the office. If they aren’t, or they struggle to juggle tasks effectively, most managers will treat that as an exception and course-correct when it’s necessary. It’s an arrangement that cuts both ways. Employers have an obligation to ensure that a workforce is properly trained for all the responsibilities that a remote role demands. More and more companies developing remote operations will contract the help of online trainers who practice what they preach. The best academies will offer flexible online course options that move fluidly with the times, providing up-to-date remote solutions for remote work problems.

With rapidly evolving digital infrastructure, a record breaking demand for working remotely, and online skills development providers preparing a ‘next generation’ workforce, the question on many people’s minds is not “Can remote work go the distance?”, but instead “Can I?”. 

The Great Resignation has shown us all that the toughest of times can make people bolder. Millions of people with digital career ambitions have immediately flipped the two words of this question into a new order, forming a simple but priceless statement of post-pandemic intent. “I Can”.

Student Spotlight: Barry Nguyen

Academy Xi Blog

Student Spotlight: Barry Nguyen

By Academy Xi

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Startup Founder, Entrepreneur, Advisor — and now Physiotherapist turned Software Engineer — Barry Nguyen proves that curiosity, passion and continuous learning can help you get ahead of the curve.

Student Spotlight: Barry Nguyen

We caught up with Barry, one of our recent Software Engineering Transform graduates. He’s kindly taken the time to share his adventures and career transition in the ‘tech world’ as a learner and startup founder. We’ll also talk about why he recommends this course to other startup founders and entrepreneurs.

Hi Barry! Thanks for taking the time to share your Xi experience with us.  How did your career in Software Engineering take shape?

After I completed my health sciences degree at the University of Melbourne, I began working in a private practice and also ran my own physiotherapy clinic in the spareroom of a local GP on saturdays. The room was small and needed to be a functional physio space, so storage was an issue. Around this time, I caught up with my high school mate and in response to my workspace problem we developed web-based software to eliminate the paper trail. That’s the point at which I realised that software engineering could be put to good use in healthcare. Following 15 years of working as a physiotherapist, I decided to enter the healthtech space. 

The Australian tech startup environment is not as developed as Silicon Valley. This means it’s normally not enough to have a plan on a piece of paper and an Ivy League education to get funding, even if it’s a really good idea. Investors want to know beforehand that new concepts will solve problems and lead to something that sells. You need to have an MVP or a tested prototype to show investors that what you’re working with is basically tried-and-true. 

I quickly realised I was spending a lot of my own money paying other people to develop working prototypes. At the same time, it was tricky to find technical co-founders. There’s a general shortage of software engineers and developers in Australia, but they’re even more scarce in the startup environment. I eventually thought to myself, “I’m not going to do this anymore. I can’t keep moving back-and-forth, it’s just too expensive and time consuming”. That’s when I realised that I needed to write code for myself. I made a positive decision to get the skills and know-how needed to realise my own MVP. 

Having made the decision to upskill, I looked at what was on offer and decided to join Academy Xi. The choice really paid off – Albert’s been a great instructor and given me the confidence to think critically about my own software designs. I test the architecture for any strengths and weaknesses, and then make simple but effective decisions about what needs to be added or subtracted.    

It’s been a few months since I graduated and I’m now fully equipped to create my own MVPs. It’s honestly been life changing – the fact that I can now call myself a qualified software engineer. It means I’m less reliant on other people’s skills and as a result, my career’s become much more streamlined. 

What were the biggest challenges and rewards that came with the course?

The prospect of studying online represented one of the biggest obstacles for me. You encounter a lot of stories about software developers and engineers self-learning on platforms such as YouTube and Udemy. There’s this question in your mind, “could I learn all this for free on YouTube?” Honestly, the answer is no, you probably can’t. YouTube videos ‘show and tell’, but the relationship ends there. This course distinguishes itself through its involvement with real people. There’s a supportive peer-to-peer network, and you also get unlimited 1:1 mentoring sessions.

Student Spotlight: Barry Nguyen Quote1

The time I spent with my mentor Albert was critical. It’s not a very content rich course – it’s more like a process of problem solving. Albert did a great job of guiding me through that.
My mentor sessions with Albert helped me fix problems before they grew, which meant I could confidently move on to the next thing.

I didn’t know initially that you could book time with your mentor every day, but when I realised this, Albert made himself available to answer my questions as they arose. At this point, my progress accelerated rapidly. This training is distinguished from other courses through its immediate feedback, if you choose to get it. I think that’s what really sets it apart – having that high level of support.

Because modern industries are prone to transformation, I think lots of people need to be prepared to reset themselves at some stage in their career. I would guess that this is one of the key traits that Academy Xi looks for in course participants – that willingness to take on the responsibilities that enable them to effect change in their careers. It’s a hard thing to pull-off, especially when you have other big responsibilities, but as Elon Musk puts it, sometimes you just need to ‘chew broken glass’.

Even with children and a full-time job, I actually completed the whole full-time course in five months. Factoring in my situation, I was really pleased with this timeline. Definitely one of the biggest rewards was being able to enhance my career and not neglect all my other life commitments. The course delivery is considerately designed for people who have lots going on. There’s also a part-time 10 month version of the same course. This might be a better option for anyone who wants that balance of career development and lifestyle. If you’ve got the drive and you’re willing to plan your time, everything you need to succeed is available.

This training is distinguished from other courses through its immediate feedback, if you choose to get it. I think that’s what really sets it apart – having that high level of support.”  – Barry Nguyen

 Why did you choose Academy Xi and what about the course experience did you value most?

We had worked with Academy Xi in the UI/UX space at my old startup and the projects really impressed me. That’s the main reason why I picked you guys over others – I’d already  collaborated with your students and the work was of a really high standard. It made the decision very easy to make. 

This whole experience has given me greater appreciation for the people giving others the opportunity to learn and develop. I started the course with a well-established career but was keen to diversify. My time with Academy Xi not only enabled me to build the tech skills I needed, but also helped me coordinate a roadmap that made diversification a reachable goal. Funnily enough, I’m back as an intern now. Sometimes I feel like I’ve taken three steps back to go ten steps forward! It’s very humbling and I don’t take anything for granted. I’m adding to my skills and network daily with experienced professionals who are also more than happy to mentor. 

These days, my approach is to always keep a beginner’s mindset. The need to remain open to new ideas and possibilities never goes away. It seems to me that too many people gather a bit of knowledge or skill and then call themselves an expert. Whenever I hear someone describe themselves as an expert, alarm bells start ringing! I think a true expert realises that expertise is not something you arrive at. It’s an ongoing process – you can never know too much. 

I’m now noticing that companies in startup environments are struggling to find Software Engineers. Mostly because they’re demanding more and more money. Experienced engineers are often ridiculously well paid and enjoy the added luxury of a remote nine-to-five job. Luckily, the investment is growing and there are plenty of lower and medium tier roles available, which means anyone with the right skills can get their foot on the ladder. My situation is a big opportunity. Hopefully I can show others that you can make the leap from seemingly unrelated roles, like mine as a clinician, into tech.

Do you have any advice on course content and how you approached your work?

I think it takes a very clear, logical mind, and grit to complete this course. Maybe people who have been exposed to this type of learning before are more likely to succeed. They begin with a clearer understanding of what the course is going to be.

My experience on the course taught me that you can’t afford to work in an environment where you’ll be easily distracted. You really have to block-out your schedule, set-up the right conditions and keep a strong sense of how and when you work best. For those periods when you’re studying, it needs to be undistracted, deep, high-value work. This course requires an advanced level of critical analysis, problem solving and lateral thinking, so make sure you give yourself the time and space to perform these tasks to the best of your abilities.

The course is also pretty condensed – there’s a lot of learning crammed into five months. What you’re doing is really important and you can’t afford to take it lightly. Other than that, I would say, “don’t be limiting in your beliefs, just do it!”

How did you get on with your mentor and cohort?

Albert has a strong and sincere desire for all in his cohort to succeed. You guys did a great job finding him! Everybody wants a mentor who is available and willing to commit time outside of scheduled classes. Everyone needs feedback to progress in their learning. Albert was always happy to discuss my work and assist me with any problems that I had throughout the course. He’s not only knowledgeable, but also passionate. These characteristics really made the difference – it was obvious that he genuinely enjoyed working with the cohort and helping everybody produce their best work. He’s also a very holistic person and encouraged us to manage our wellbeing. Balancing hard work, health and happiness is probably the key to long-term success, and Albert made sure we kept that balance a priority.

Albert believes in long-term relationships that last beyond the five months. He’s still in contact today and pleased to help with my career as it’s unfolding. It’s like being part of a good school alumni where you make lasting friendships. The whole cohort collaborated on so many interesting projects together – we worked through hardships and brought things to fruition together. In the end, you walk away with connections that couldn’t be made at a networking event. The relationships are formed over time and really are built to last.

In the end, you walk away with connections that couldn’t be made at a networking event. The relationships are formed over time and really are built to last. ”  – Barry Nguyen

Why would you recommend the Software Engineering Transform course to startup founders and entrepreneurs?

For me, the course made a lot of financial sense. It cost close to $15,000, which was tax deductible, but gave me the knowledge and skills to develop new MVPs for the rest of my career. Gone are the days when I’ll be paying someone $50,000 to design one MVP without any guarantee that their work will match my initial ideas. For that reason alone, I believe most startup entrepreneurs will get real value for money with this course.

Student Spotlight: Barry Nguyen Quote2

If you’re serious about creating a startup that succeeds, you need to have the tools to at least begin building it from the ground up. This doesn’t mean that a CTO or technical co-founder will do all the coding alone – it’s more about making sure that you have more than just soft skills. People always talk about soft skills, but they won’t always be enough to get the job done.

As Sam Altman, former President of Y Combinator advises in his blog post to aspiring tech founders, “Non-technical founder? Learn to hack.”

My qualification with Academy Xi has left me feeling less at risk – upskilling is one of the best ways to keep your tech contribution relevant and valuable. It’s also given me the confidence to follow through with my own software designs. I’ve found that having the ability to do certain things changes the conversations I have with people. I spoke to a venture capitalist the other day and he said, “You learned that? You created that?”. It has the potential to completely change what you’re working on and who you’re working with.

What’s next for you, Barry? 

Well, I’m finishing my internship and planning on doing everything I can to help my company succeed. The ultimate goal is to be an inspiration to others and create a notable Aussie company in health technology of a similar impact to the local startup ecosystem like Canva and Atlassian. I’m already building out my MVP and steadily getting that ready to launch. 

As I go, I’ll also be raising money for the project and drumming-up support through skilled partnerships. It would be great to involve Academy Xi at some stage, so watch this space!

Academy Xi Webinars

How to combat ‘Digital Imposter Syndrome’

By Academy Xi

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Less than 40% of Australians feel confident that they can keep up with the rapid pace of change in technology (Digital Nation Australia, 2021).

Most of us have felt digital imposter syndrome at some point in our professional lives. When it comes to teams and organisations, this seemingly innocuous mindset can be a challenge for leaders. It can hold staff back from asking necessary questions, hinder productivity and stall growth. With many of us continuing to ‘Work From Home’, we’ve also lost the ability to physically turn to a colleague for help.

Join our panel of digital experts as we discuss how businesses and individuals can overcome digital imposter syndrome.

Join our speakers: 

  • Matt Tsourdalakis – Lead Product Designer, SelfWealth
  • Anjully Lozano – CX Design Lead, Officeworks
  • Taîss Quartápa – Senior Manager – Strategy & Consulting: Technology Advisory, Accenture

In this video, you’ll learn:

  • How businesses can take their people on the digital transformation journey
  • What mindsets work best to succeed in the ever-evolving digital and tech landscape
  • How workplace cultural change can alleviate anxiety around digital

Keen to join us? Register now.

Want to keep up to date with the latest webinars from Academy Xi? Follow us here on LinkedIn.
Team collaboration on design

Academy Xi Blog

Four types of design training – how to choose the best fit for a team

By Academy Xi

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Team collaboration on design

You know that good design leads to better team performance, enhanced creativity and a closer connection to your customer, but what is the best way for your team to learn its practises? There are a number of providers offering a range of design disciplines, including Human-Centred Design, UX Design, Design Thinking, Service Design, Customer Experience Design… Where is best to start?

We’ve pulled together a list of goals that we think a manager might be looking toward in order to help their team achieve and mapped these goals against our various learning experiences. Hopefully this will help you navigate some of the most effective digital design options currently available. 

For raising design awareness and building lasting confidence

 Good design principles can be applied in any team – but first we have to demystify them. Unfortunately, design often lives in a ‘black box’. Insider jargon and complex methodologies  can make it seem inaccessible. High functioning design doesn’t need to be complicated. In fact, it works best when it is uncomplicated. If we strip it back, design is a vehicle through which creativity and innovation can be systematically nurtured. We know that when this is properly implemented, it will inevitably impact the bottom-line. According to a study conducted by Adobe, companies that foster creativity enjoy 1.5 times greater market share (2016, Adobe, ‘Design-Led Firms Win the Business Advantage’ report). Short introductory experiences can illustrate how good design can remedy static BAU thinking. With this in mind, we’ve developed a suite of intro courses and upskilling workshops designed to build lasting competence and confidence in foundational skills.
 
Matched learning experiences:

For tackling real business challenges and building technical capability

In pre-pandemic times Australia was already in the early stages of a digital skills crisis. The sudden halt imposed on skilled migration has led to shortages in certain roles (product managers, software developers, UXers and other digital specialists), particularly at a senior level. If and when you do manage to find people with the right talent, they often demand  very high salaries and can be poached by other companies trying to solve exactly the same problem.
 
Businesses undoubtedly need these kinds of digital experts to carry their growth strategies forward. When struggling to access the talent they need, they are often forced to be creative, cultivating their technical capabilities in-house. 
 
 Matched learning experiences:

For scaling and embedding organisational change

Many of the biggest challenges facing businesses are essentially design problems. Design maturity and digital maturity come when innovative ways of working take root and are used reflexively across an organisation. Every modern business has this forefront of mind. When done well, this looks like obsessive customer focus, creativity across business functions and  a collaborative ability to respond appropriately to rapidly evolving competitive environments. The impact of these kinds of agile organisational behaviours are consistently felt at the bottom-line level too. According to a recent McKinsey report, design-driven organisations outperform their competitors by 2:1 (2018, McKinsey & Co., ‘The Business Value of Design’ report). Having supported major corporates and government departments with their transformation programs, we’ve learned that the most successful approaches will incorporate everyone, from front-line staff through to executive teams. You want your people to excel instead of being left behind.
 
Matched learning experiences:

For addressing changing talent needs

Sometimes training your people in new design practices comes off the back of shifting priorities. These changes can impact hiring practices, development programs and talent management. Maybe Design Thinking is fast becoming an organisation-wide priority and you’d like every new-starter to receive foundational training so they are immediately brought up to speed. Perhaps a group needs to be deployed and their focus trained on digital design initiatives. Read our digital workforce transformation piece on how we developed the Australian Department of Health’s new team of digital leaders. 
 
Interviewed by the Harvard Business Review, former PepsiCO CEO Indra Nooyi claimed that design had a voice in nearly every crucial decision the company made while she was at the helm. The impact was enormous, as sales increased by 80% throughout her time in the role.  With these kinds of results, design in its various forms is here to stay. The question is, where is your organisation going to start?
 
Matched learning experiences:

 

Interested in learning more about how your team can harness good design and make great decisions? Get in touch to discuss how we can help you achieve your innovation goals.